Mr. Toot probably wishes we were still a British colony

Actually the flatulent, corpulent, and unemployed loser probably wishes that we were part of the Islamic umma. Vox is  a particularly nasty left-wing blog that Mr. Toot  links to often.He probably wants them to buy up (it will only cost probably $20) Little Green Footballs and hope that they will pay him to write his drivel. This article is so absurd that I do not even know where to start – however it proves that the kerfuffle over the Confederate battle flag (note that it was the battle flag, not the country flag which resembled the Stars and Stripes) only masks a deeper hatred of the United States flag.
Back to the article – yeah America would have been better off if we did not break away from Britain. That way we could have been part of an imperialist, class driven society and empire, sent our sons off to die in places such as India, South Africa, Malaysia, and Ireland, and we would have had Socialism imposed upon us sooner. I tell you what Dylan Matthews and Mr. Toot – get the fuck out of America, relocate to the United Kingdom  and never even dream about coming back! As for independence being bad for “Native Americans” – I suppose they would have been better off as a society that hunts and roams and had no idea about such foolish contraptions as the wheel or the horse. Stop romanticizng the American Indians! As for the joys of British rule I guess the Irish famine  victims would beg to differ, if they were alive. As for a parliamentary system of government – contemplate this: Barack Hussein Obama would have been gone a long time ago so I guess there is some merit to that. However what Dylan Matthews really desires I suspect is a “People’s Republic” sort of government as they have in China, North Korea, Cuba,  and Pol Pot’s Cambodia. Since you love monarchy so much then the Kim dynasty in the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea is right up your alley.

 

3 reasons the American Revolution was a mistake

by Dylan Matthews

This July 4th, I’m celebrating by taking a plane from the US to the United Kingdom. The timing wasn’t intentional, but I embrace the symbolism. American independence in 1776 was a monumental mistake. We should be mourning the fact that we left the United Kingdom, not cheering it.

Of course, evaluating the wisdom of the American Revolution means dealing with counterfactuals. As any historian would tell you, this is messy business. We obviously can’t be entirely sure how America would have fared if it had stayed in the British Empire longer, perhaps gaining independence a century or so later, along with Canada.

But I’m reasonably confident a world where the revolution never happened would be better than the one we live in now, for three main reasons: slavery would’ve been abolished earlier, American Indians would’ve faced rampant persecution but not the outright ethnic cleansing Andrew Jackson and other American leaders perpetrated, and America would have a parliamentary system of government that makes policymaking easier and lessens the risk of democratic collapse.

The main reason the revolution was a mistake is that the British Empire, in all likelihood, would have abolished slavery earlier than the US did, and with less bloodshed.

Abolition in most of the British Empire occurred in 1834, following the passage of the Slavery Abolition Act. That left out India, but slavery was banned there too in 1843. In England itself, slavery was illegal at least going back to 1772. That’s decades earlier than the United States.

This alone is enough to make the case against the revolution. Decades less slavery is a massive humanitarian gain that almost certainly dominates whatever gains came to the colonists from independence.

The main benefit of the revolution to colonists was that it gave more political power to America’s white male minority. For the vast majority of the country — its women, slaves, American Indians — the difference between disenfranchisement in an independent America and disenfranchisement in a British-controlled colonial America was negligible. If anything, the latter would’ve been preferable, since at least women and minorities wouldn’t be singled out for disenfranchisement. From the vantage point of most of the country, who cares if white men had to suffer through what everyone else did for a while longer, especially if them doing so meant slaves gained decades of free life?

It’s true that, had the US stayed, Britain would have had much more to gain from the continuance of slavery than it did without America. It controlled a number of dependencies with slave economies — notably Jamaica and other islands in the West Indies — but nothing on the scale of the American South. Adding that into the mix would’ve made abolition significantly more costly.

But the South’s political influence within the British Empire would have been vastly smaller than its influence in the early American Republic. For one thing, the South, like all other British dependencies, lacked representation in Parliament. The Southern states were colonies and their interests were discounted by the British government accordingly. But the South was also simply smaller as a chunk of the British Empire’s economy at the time than it was as a portion of America’s. The British Crown had less to lose from the abolition of slavery than white elites in an independent America did.

The revolutionaries understood this. Indeed, a desire to preserve slavery helped fuel Southern support for the war. In 1775, after the war had begun in Massachusetts, the Earl of Dunmore, then governor of Virginia, offered the slaves of rebels freedom if they came and fought for the British cause. Eric Herschthal, a PhD student in history at Columbia, notes that the proclamation united white Virginians behind the rebel effort. He quotes Philip Fithian, who was traveling through Virginia when the proclamation was made, saying, “The Inhabitants of this Colony are deeply alarmed at this infernal Scheme. It seems to quicken all in Revolution to overpower him at any Risk.” Anger at Dunmore’s emancipation ran so deep that Thomas Jefferson included it as a grievance in a draft of the Declaration of Independence. That’s right: the Declaration could’ve included “they’re conscripting our slaves” as a reason for independence.

For white slaveholders in the South, Simon Schama writes in Rough Crossings, his history of black loyalism during the Revolution, the war was “a revolution, first and foremost, mobilized to protect slavery.”

Slaves also understood that their odds of liberation were better under British rule than independence. Over the course of the war, about 100,000 African slaves escaped, died, or were killed, and tens of thousands enlisted in the British army, far more than joined the rebels. “Black Americans’ quest for liberty was mostly tied to fighting for the British — the side in the War for Independence that offered them freedom,” historian Gary Nash writes in The Forgotten Fifth, his history of African Americans in the revolution. At the end of the war, thousands who helped the British were evacuated to freedom in Nova Scotia, Jamaica, and England.

This is not to say the British were motivated by a desire to help slaves; of course they weren’t. But American slaves chose a side in the revolution, the side of the Crown. They were no fools. They knew that independence meant more power for the plantation class that had enslaved them and that a British victory offered far greater prospects for freedom.

[….]

But all the same, the policy enraged American settlers, who were appalled that the British would seem to side with Indians over white men. “The British government remained willing to conceive of Native Americans as subjects of the crown, similar to colonists,” Ethan Schmidt writes in Native Americans in the American Revolution. “American colonists … refused to see Indians as fellow subjects. Instead, they viewed them as obstacles in the way of their dreams of land ownership and trading wealth.” This view is reflected in the Declaration of Independence, which attacks King George III for backing “merciless Indian Savages.”

[……]

When a cause is opposed by the two most vulnerable groups in a society, it’s probably a bad idea

And, unsurprisingly, Canada didn’t see Indian wars and removals as large and sweeping as occurred in the US. They still committed horrible, indefensible crimes. Canada, under British rule and after, brutally mistreated aboriginal people, not least through government-inflicted famines and the state’s horrific seizure of children from their families so they could attend residential schools. But the country didn’t experience a Westward expansion as violent and deadly as that pursued by the US government and settlers. Absent the revolution, Britain probably would’ve moved into Indian lands. But fewer people would have died.

None of this is to minimize the extent of British and Canadian crimes against Natives. “It’s a hard case to make because even though I do think Canada’s treatment of Natives was better than the United States, it was still terrible,” the Canadian essayist Jeet Heer tells me in an email (Heer has also written a great case against American independence). “On the plus side for Canada: there were no outright genocides like the Trail of Tears (aside from the Beothuks of Newfoundland). The population statistics are telling: 1.4 million people of aboriginal descent in Canada as against 5.2 million in the USA. Given the fact that America is far more hospitable as an environment and has 10 times the non-aboriginal population, that’s telling.”

Independence also enabled acquisition of territory in the West through the Louisiana Purchase and the Mexican-American War. That ensured that America’s particularly rapacious brand of colonialism ensnared yet more native peoples. And while Mexico and France were no angels, what America brought was worse. Before the war, the Apache and Comanche were in frequent violent conflict with the Mexican government. But they were Mexican citizens. The US refused to make them American citizens for a century. And then, of course, it violently forced them into reservations, killing many in the process.

American Indians would have still, in all likelihood, faced violence and oppression absent American independence, just as First Nations people in Canada did. But American-scale ethnic cleansing wouldn’t have occurred. And like America’s slaves, American Indians knew this. Most tribes sided with the British or stayed neutral; only a small minority backed the rebels. Generally speaking, when a cause is opposed by the two most vulnerable groups in a society, it’s probably a bad idea. So it is with the cause of American independence.

Finally, we’d still likely be a monarchy, under the rule of Elizabeth II, and constitutional monarchy is the best system of government known to man. Generally speaking, in a parliamentary system, you need a head of state who is not the prime minister to serve as a disinterested arbiter when there are disputes about how to form a government — say, if the largest party should be allowed to form a minority government or if smaller parties should be allowed to form a coalition, to name a recent example from Canada. That head of state is usually a figurehead president elected by the parliament (Germany, Italy) or the people (Ireland, Finland), or a monarch. And monarchs are better.

Monarchs are more effective than presidents precisely because they lack any semblance of legitimacy. It would be offensive for Queen Elizabeth or her representatives in Canada, New Zealand, etc. to meddle in domestic politics. Indeed, when the Governor-General of Australia did so in 1975 it set off a constitutional crisis that made it clear such behavior would not be tolerated. But figurehead presidents have some degree of democratic legitimacy and are typically former politicians. That enables a greater rate of shenanigans — like when Italian president Giorgio Napolitano schemed, successfully, to remove Silvio Berlusconi as prime minister due at least in part to German chancellor Angela Merkel’s entreaties to do so.

[…..]

 

Read the rest if you can stomach it. http://www.vox.com/2015/7/2/8884885/american-revolution-mistake

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137 Comments on “Mr. Toot probably wishes we were still a British colony”

  1. Zeus Crankypants says:

    My tribute to July 4.

    Lesser known facts about Independence Day

    http://www.theflume.com/free_content/article_894ffe88-21c9-11e5-8f58-83d64fed8af2.html

    I guess journalist are bias. The closing paragraph in my article was from my voice.

    [blockquote]July 4 embodies the history, politics and the people of that summer in 1776 and offers both a legacy of the past and a beacon for the future.[/blockquote]

    I don’t know how that paragraph slipped by my very progressive editor. It’s usually me who has to argue with her when I think an article has bias.

    Happy Independence Day everyone.

  2. Zeus Crankypants says:

    Ok. Looks like [blockquote] doesn’t work on WordPress.

  3. There’s a feeling at large in the country today that a Government isn’t a tyranny so long as it’s only persecuting people they don’t like anyway.

  4. swamprat says:

    Google has a nice picture that completely obfuscates the reason and meanings of Independence Day.

    I expected it.

    Just like the article above

    Finally, we’d still likely be a monarchy, under the rule of Elizabeth II, and constitutional monarchy is the best system of government known to man

    Yeah, constitutional monarchy, you’re soaking in it.

    • swamprat says:

      blockquote worked

    • The Democrat left is very much enamored with the idea of a hereditary ruling class.

    • Chunky's Missing Brain says:

      They hate America. Unfortunately I own their stock and it does quite well.

    • What idiot actually wrote this …

      “Finally, we’d still likely be a monarchy, under the rule of Elizabeth II, and constitutional monarchy is the best system of government known to man”

      No, you asshole. Representative government, preferably of the Constitutional Republic sort, is the best form of government, right now.

      Where do these people come from?

  5. swamprat says:

    From above;

    This view is reflected in the Declaration of Independence, which attacks King George III for backing “merciless Indian Savages.”

    but the actual, you know, constitution, makes it clear that the argument given was not against those “backed” by ol’ King George, but rather the argument addresses the tactics of the alleged hired mercenaries and/or incited natives
    that is to say;

    merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare, is undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

    Ah, the surly temerity of objecting to being subjected to wholesale unconditional slaughter! What bigotry. How racist.

  6. rightymouse says:

    “….and constitutional monarchy is the best system of government known to man.”

    Most idiotic statement I’ve seen in a long time.

  7. Juan Epstein says:

    Rent Last of the Mohicans, morons.

    • rightymouse says:

      Also, “1776” and the mini-series “John Adams”.

      • Because olo says:

        Yeah, there was this little thing about Mad King George that Numnutz conveniently leaves out.

        That, and the fact that if the American Colonists hadn’t revolted, the rest of the empire would have in all likelihood stayed empire for a lot longer. I wonder what the East Indians think of all the voxsplaining.

      • Chunky's Missing Brain says:

        I DVR 1776 every year. Love it.

  8. rightymouse says:

    Careful. Fatso may take you seriously.

  9. Captain Death says:

    “Over the course of the war, about 100,000 African slaves escaped, died, or were killed, and tens of thousands enlisted in the British army, far more than joined the rebels” – where is that jerk getting his information from?

  10. Speranza says:

    “Stop romanticizng the American Indians! ” amen to that Hercules! The Santee Sioux in Minnesota in 1862 during the height of the Civil War raped and murdered their way across Minnesota.

    • rightymouse says:

      There are a number of horror stories of their brutality in New England as well.

    • swamprat says:

      If you track these things, they go back a long way. One side gets revenge for something that was a retribution for a former outrage that was retaliation for…..

      I read an article about an Indian group killed by soldiers and how awful, etc. But I knew about the kidnapping and raid that had caused it, because an even smaller local paper randomly posted local history.
      Bet your butt, there was yet an earlier event causing the raid and kidnapping.

      Fav story:
      Indians raid and kidnap a young girl of sixteen. A recovery is launched. One fellow named Dan falls into Indian hands during the recovery re-raid. He lives. They skint old Dan. He survives somehow and escapes. The Indians would display Dan’s hide at social events such as treaty negotiations, ’cause it made the white eyes’ eyes, even whiter.
      Dan wasn’t considered of much account before he got skinned, nor after. the girl recovered and was an asset to the community.

    • Chunky's Missing Brain says:

      Oh dincha know they had a totally equal society?

    • What are the pre-Colonial stats on Indian-on-Indian violence? I bet you’ll find it was exclusively a tribe vs. tribe or nation vs. nation thing. As if these peoples were living in the Garden of Frakking Eden before the Europeoners arrived.

  11. rightymouse says:

    Does this moron realize that the folks who came over on the Mayflower had originally escaped England due to the tyranny of a monarch??

  12. swamprat says:

    And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.

    written by our atheist Founding Fathers.

    • rightymouse says:

      They risked everything to secure freedom. Not just for themselves, but for subsequent generations.

      “QUOTATION: “Well, Doctor, what have we got—a Republic or a Monarchy?”

      “A Republic, if you can keep it.”
      ATTRIBUTION: The response is attributed to BENJAMIN FRANKLIN—at the close of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, when queried as he left Independence Hall on the final day of deliberation—in the notes of Dr. James McHenry, one of Maryland’s delegates to the Convention.’

  13. Zeus Crankypants says:

    swamprat
    July 4, 2015 at 12:03 pm

    And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.

    written by our atheist Founding Fathers.

    Nothing about god there. “Devine Providence?” What’s that. For all we know it could have been some local micro-brew.

    • Minnow says:

      …or, they were all Green Bay Packers fans.

    • Pakimon says:

      “And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence,”

      I always wondered what Divine’s last name was. 😆

    • Because olo says:

      Divine providence means Gaia to progs.

      • swamprat says:

        Good news! You have the right to marry!
        The bad news is you lose the right to bear arms
        That’s ok, I am with Golden Gloves…
        …. and they come all the up past my elbows!

  14. Pakimon says:

    I’d suggest using Chunkles’ Cheetos cache. 😆

    • Pakimon says:

      Even now, a chair in Culver City groans under the weight of a corpulent ponytailed blogger.

    • kbdabear says:

      Stop eating enough for 4 billion of them for starters …

    • Chunky's Missing Brain says:

      Well we were hoping privileged old fat white pony tailed Tooty Farts would take a break from the feedbag every once in a while.

  15. ISpeakJive says:

    The myth of the peaceful Indian needs to go away. One of our favorite day trips is to go roam around Indian ruins. They are all over. Yeah, they had great views, but you lived in an 8X8 room with a 6 foot ceiling and a hole in the middle of the roof for smoke. You scrabbled for game and grew spindly corn, and fought off neighboring tribes for your food supplies when drought hit, which was often. You watered your fields carrying all the water on your head in a pot. That’s why they tended to build basically fortresses in defensive positions. You had no written word, and a life expectancy of 30 years. Oh, yeah, and you owned slaves.
    They were overtaken and oppressed and forced into Christianity, but you can blame that on the Spanish. Another simply wonderful European Monarchy! Horrible.
    Just about like life as an English peasant, circa 600 AD, I would presume.

    • Because olo says:

      And while we’re dispelling Indian myths, Chief Seattle did NOT write that mushy bumf about the buffalo and the iron horses. They never had buffalo in the Puget Sound ever, and trains didn’t arrive there until after Seattle’s death.

      It was written by a white hippy in the 1970s.

  16. kbdabear says:

    So, the Indians sided with the British out of ideology and not because maybe they like many other fellow human beings tended to put all their bets on the heavy favorite instead of the side who was a severe underdog

    Lesson in life folks, NEVER, EVER, take anyone named “Dylan” seriously.

  17. Pakimon says:

    On a lighter note…

    Ms. Sssssss celebrates 4th of July in spectacular fashion! 😆

    • Octopus says:

      I would hit that. Rather than hit the ground at terminal velocity, I mean. Helloo, Miss Ssss.

  18. kbdabear says:

    It speaks volumes that a month after Ginger was kicked off Twitter and his site is supposedly on death watch, Toot still can’t stop talking about him

  19. kbdabear says:

    Anyone been following the Reddit meltdown under “Chairman Pao?

    She’s turning a free and open service into an SJW style “safe space” gulag.

    Reddit CEO Ellen Pao, AKA “Chairman Pao” and Toot should hook up, they think so much alike

    • rightymouse says:

      Well………

      • Minnow says:

        cutting edge!?

        Our history?

        You, sir, are delusional.

      • Because olo says:

        Got stuck to his own Picard, eh? He who lives by the ban stick…

      • swamprat says:

        hypocrisy meter is quietly gibbering to itself

      • ISpeakJive says:

        Hoisted by his own retard.

      • kbdabear says:

        I can guess the real story behind that. Toot and his cultists probably tried to gang up on certain accounts to get them banned and it backfired on him badly.

        “On the cutting edge?”

        More like “Cutting and Pasting Edge”

      • kbdabear says:

        Since Reddit users tend to lean to the left if they aren’t libertarians, it looks like Toot tried his GlennGreenwald GlenBeck act on Reddit and didn’t find a receptive crowd. Reddit also takes a little more intelligence to master than Twitter.

  20. ISpeakJive says:

    Octo, are you still planning a trip to Greece this summer?

    They are getting ready to nationalize the bank accounts. WOW- not good.

  21. Because olo says:

    Tell me about it. 😆

    • swamprat says:

      While you stalk Ginger Johnson, Pam Geller, And Andrew, the-dead-blogger, Breitbart.

  22. Chunky's Missing Brain says:

    Where do you start with this? He’s advocating for mercurial and dictatorial rule and taxation without representation? He thinks the Brits didn’t want to plunder America’s resources as much as America’s “privileged white men”. What an ass. He thinks they wouldn’t have stomped on the Natives as hard? Really? The “ethnic” cleansing was people’s response in those days to tit for tit mass murders, kidnappings and you name it outrages. Scalping? Brits would have tolerated that? What an idiot. It’s unfortunate but when the Natives finally decided to band together and go to war it was too late. And there was too much bad. It’s countless times in history in prehistory no doubt. One wins the other loses and loses their culture. The Native males were just as entitled and in their minds within their culture and just as brutal.

    Alternate history can be fun but not so much when fueled by leftist agenda. Any decisions made by the Brits after they lost the colonies cannot be assumed. If America had remained subjects the Brits would have grown rich off the South’s slavery institution and might very well not have outlawed slavery in Britain in 1834 as a result. And they may instead have encouraged it and continued it a lot longer.

  23. Because olo says:

    • Because olo says:

      It’s rapidly getting to the point where Gus’s toots are looking sane next to Toot’s toots. Even when’s he’s drunk and doing the single words.

    • swamprat says:

      Which would be akin to an unusual snow storm being attributed to global warming.

    • poteen2 says:

      Nah. That’s the Democrats making that argument. And you Charlie.

  24. swamprat says:

    Because olo

    July 4, 2015 at 9:18 pm

    It’s rapidly getting to the point where Gus’s toots are looking sane next to Toot’s toots. Even when’s he’s drunk and doing the single words.
    Gus has an occasional moment of clarity now and then.

  25. swamprat says:

    Artisanal Constitutional Monarchy;
    For Those Who Desire The Very Best in Government.

  26. Octopus says:

    Oh, my.

  27. kbdabear says:

    Is there enough in the GoFundMe pot for a new box of crayons?

  28. Speranza says:

    George Takei
    Actor played Hikaru Sulu in ‘Star Trek’
    · July 3 at 3:41pm · Edited ·

    I owe an apology. On the eve of this Independence Day, I have a renewed sense of what this country stands for, and how I personally could help achieve it. The promise of equality and freedom is one that all of us have to work for, at all times. I know this as a survivor of the Japanese American internment, which each day drives me only to strive harder to help fulfill that promise for future generations.

    I recently was asked by a reporter about Justice Clarence Thomas’s dissent in the marriage equality cases, in which he wrote words that really got under my skin, by suggesting that the government cannot take away human dignity through slavery, or though internment. In my mind that suggested that this meant he felt the government therefore shouldn’t be held accountable, or should do nothing in the face of gross violations of dignity. When asked by a reporter about the opinion, I was still seething, and I referred to him as a “clown in blackface” to suggest that he had abdicated and abandoned his heritage. This was not intended to be racist, but rather to evoke a history of racism in the theatrical arts. While I continue to vehemently disagree with Justice Thomas, the words I chose, said in the heat of anger, were not carefully considered.

    I am reminded, especially on this July 4th holiday, that though we have the freedom to speak our minds, we must use that freedom judiciously. Each of us, as humans, have hot-button topics that can set us off, and Justice Thomas had hit mine, that is clear. But my choice of words was regrettable, not because I do not believe Justice Thomas is deeply wrong, but because they were ad hominem and uncivil, and for that I am sorry.

    I often ask fans to keep the level of discourse on this page and in comments high, and to remember that we all love this country and for what it stands. even if we often disagree passionately about how to achieve those goals. I did not live up to my own high standards in this instance.

    I hope all of you have a wonderful, safe and joyously free July 4th, the first where all married couples in the U.S. can enjoy the full liberties of matrimony equally. It is truly a blessing to be an American today.

    • rightymouse says:

      How sweet.

    • Juan Epstein says:

      “Survivor” of the internment camps.

      How did you make it through all the starvation, forced labor and pestilence?

    • rightymouse says:

    • pineapple says:

      “I often ask fans to remember that we all love this country and for what it stands, even if we often disagree passionately about how to achieve those goals.”

      This is what’s known as Pollyanna land George.

    • Chunky's Missing Brain says:

      So it was like that episode when Sulu went insane due to some space virus and started swashbuckling around the ship with a Japanese sword and mister Spock had to do the old neck pinch thing on him? And then he got better and then it’s like “Warp speed ahead Mr. Sulu.”

    • Speranza says:

      Lying sack of shit!

  29. Pakimon says:

    15 hours since Chunkles’ last tweet.

    What could’ve happened?

    Is he guarding his Cheetos stash?

    Has he finally gotten so rotund that he’s wedged in a doorway and can’t move?

    So many questions that need answering! 😮

    • Pakimon says:

      I know!

      He’s writing a longform Atlantic-style long piece about his brief tenure with PJ Media.

      I imagine it’ll be a sordid tale about Pam Gellar being the sultry temptress who was enchanted by his luxurious Jazzy Ponytail™ and how she kept flinging herself upon him. 😆

      • Chunky's Missing Brain says:

        It will begin with “So they issued me my Klansman robe and made me swear on the white man’s superiority and privilege. Then we all saluted a swastika flag and cursed MLK”.

    • Because olo says:

      Race Detective reporting for duty.

  30. pineapple says:

    Yea… I know. When I saw him walking on and burning the American flag the first thing that came to my mind was the GOP.

    • Octopus says:

      This dingbat encapsulates all the wacky moonbattery of the shit-for-brains Left. Give ’em a trophy!

  31. pineapple says:

    I actually thought that was kinda funny.

    Obummer can not be the brunt of jokes NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO!

    • Chunky's Missing Brain says:

      Weigel probably actually meant it as a sarcastic joke. The leftists want to declare their independence from the Constitution. They’re finally getting their way with the two rogue branches of govt.

      • pineapple says:

        He got big time heat for it and blew them all off.

        Libtards have zero sense of humor.

    • Because olo says:

      There are some seriously tinkled off replies. Seriously tinkled off. 😆

  32. Because olo says:

  33. pineapple says:

  34. pineapple says:

    Ouch

  35. kbdabear says:

    The South “skews” America? How about California’s 55 electoral votes which are pretty much in the bank for Toot’s party?

  36. Octopus says:

    I’ve actually enjoyed watching the soccer game. Didn’t think that was possible. 😉

    • Because olo says:

      Boobies too small.

    • pineapple says:

      I find soccer a whole lot of excitement with little payoff.

      It helps when the game doesn’t end 1-0…. but for the most part…. meh.

      • Octopus says:

        If they scored all the time like the US did in the first minutes of this game, it would be fun to watch. The second half was interminable.

  37. pineapple says:

    “Maybe it’s time for right wing lunatics to put down all their flags and symbols and weapons, and start taking part in building a country that we can all be proud of.”

    This here is Charles TOOT Johnson living in la-la land. Yea, we’ll get right on that Fatso. Fuck you and the blubber you rode in on.

    • Because olo says:

      “Maybe it’s time for left wing lunatics to put down all their theft and censorship and trigger warnings, and start taking part in building a country that we can all be proud of.”

      Nah. Never happen.

    • Minnow says:

      Barry said this!? Really?

      Hey Barry, what do YOU fucking know about building anything?

      Seriously!?

      This has to be the most clueless thing ever stated by Barry – EVER!

      Don’t get me going Barry…….

      (like you know shit about building anything……snort!)

    • Because olo says:

  38. Octopus says:

    Chunky McDumbth is the Greece of personal fiscal acumen. How’s that begging bowl going? 😆

  39. It saddens me to think of all the brain matter you once had squandered on a deeply stupid blog like this.

    You really need to get outside more.

    And you really need to be relieved of your guns.

    That’s why I’m taking them.

    • Minnow says:

      Hahahahahahahahaha….. you?

      Kiss my ass Bozo.

      FYI, you ain’t taking anything from me but shit.

      Or…. you will die trying dumbass.

      Spit.

    • Octopus says:

      Hey, Stabs…how much have you, personally, donated to Chunky’s begging bowl? It’s been dead in the water for about a month, despite Fatass’s attempts to prime the pump personally. Aren’t you worried he’s going to fold his tent, and seek gainful employment? Heheh…no, you’re not worried. Not about that. 😆

    • pineapple says:

      Some mighty big ovaries you got there Stabby. You were FAR more interesting on LGF.

    • frabbystinclair says:

      Ron Jeremy relieved franksinclair’s mom of her ass virginity.

  40. Octopus says:

    That’s a direct slap to Chunky’s fat face. What are you playing at, Gustavo? Some kind of hobo rebellion? A boxcar-coup d’etat? The old bum’s rush?

  41. Minnow says:

    Big, badass Frank…. All hat – no cattle!

    I guess it has taken you years to achieve this lowly position in the social strata.

    Good for you.

  42. Octopus says:

  43. Octopus says:

    Chunky could learn from Charlie…

  44. Bunk X says:

    Here you go, Charles. Another #Rumpswab fan.